Police are investigating a collision in Surrey on Saturday where a vehicle caught fire. Surrey R-C-M-P say the driver of that vehicle suffered serious injuries while a passenger was treated for minor injuries. The driver of the other vehicle wasn’t hurt.

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Abbotsford police are investigating a shooting incident late Saturday. They say a 22-year-old man and his girlfriend reported they were in a car parked in a residential driveway when they were shot at by someone in a pickup truck. The couple’s vehicle and a house were reportedly hit by the gunfire, but no people were injured. Investigators say they don’t believe it was a random attack.

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B.C. teachers are calling out the provincial government for false advertising when it comes to its promotion of the back-to-school plan. An ad featuring Dr. Bonnie Henry is being criticized by the president of the BC Teachers’ Federation for painting an unrealistic picture of what the return to school will be like amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

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I-C-B-C is adding new road test appointments to try to reduce a back-log of drivers waiting for tests. They closed testing centers in mid-March due to the COVID-19 pandemic, preventing many new drivers from being able to get their license. It says it has added two-thousand appointments for road testing dates starting September 9th.– most of them in Metro Vancouver.

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is set to announce details of the government’s deal with a third vaccine developer to get access to an experimental COVID-19 vaccine. Novovax’s vaccine is currently in preliminary trials in the United States and Australia and needs to pass safety reviews then be approved by Health Canada. The contract promises to secure 76-million doses of the vaccine.

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Tributes continue to pour in for actor Chadwick Boseman. Those honouring the “Black Panther” star include former U-S President Barack Obama, who met the actor at the White House.   Boseman died Friday at age 43, four years after he was diagnosed with colon cancer. Boseman’s roles included playing Jackie Robinson in the biopic “42,” and of course“Black Panther.”

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Not a great weekend for the Canucks they dropped game 3 and 4.  The Las Vegas Golden Knights are now up 3-1 in the series.  It’s now do or die for the Canucks in game 5 on Tuesday night.

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Fraser Health confirms COVID-19 case with staff member at Normanna in Burnaby
The staff member has tested positive for COVID-19. A Fraser Health rapid response team is at the site and communication with residents and families is underway.
Normanna is a long term care facility in Burnaby, The staff member is currently in self-isolation at their home.
Enhanced control measures have been put in place at the site and Fraser Health is working with staff to identify anyone who may have been exposed and is taking steps to protect the health of all staff, residents and families.

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B-C is reporting 294 new cases of COVID-19 over the past three
days as well as four more deaths — all residents of long-term care
homes.
Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry says recent increases
in cases are concerning with September arriving tomorrow.
Henry says people needed to re-connect with family and friends
over the summer but it’s now time to take a step back from social
interactions.
She says the bar to stay home needs to be lower than it’s ever
been before so the province can successfully move forward when the
respiratory season arrives.

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Delta police say officers helped rescue a hypodermic paddle
boarder after she was carried far from Centennial Beach on the
weekend.
Police say the woman was with someone at the beach who called police after
he failed to find her for more than 40 minutes on Saturday.
They say he called back a short time later to say he’d found her
and she had become extremely cold and was unable to continue on her
own.
Officers who made a two kilometre trek out in the shallow waters
of Boundary Bay found the pair and had to carry the woman back to
shore because she was unable to walk.
The boarder was taken to hospital and is in much better condition

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A new “Surrey Blended” program is being rolled out for Surrey-area students who are not keen to return to class full-time this fall.
The “transition program” will be offered to both elementary and secondary students,
For elementary-aged kids, Surrey Blended “is a combination of online and face-to-face learning through your local school, with a goal of gradually increasing face-to-face instruction
In addition to Surrey Blended, students and parents can register for full-time in-class instruction. Secondary students are also given the option of Surrey Academy of Innovative Learning (SAIL), the district’s online school.
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The City of White Rock’s 2019 annual report is now available for public review and local residents have two weeks to provide submissions, comments and questions on its contents.
The 86-page document can be found on the city’s website – whiterock.ca– and includes a summary of 2019 milestones; a progress report on the 2018-2022 Council Strategic Priorities plan; financial reporting; and statements from both the mayor and CAO.
The annual report is a requirement under B.C.’s Community Charter.
Written submissions on the report must be received by noon Sept. 14, which can be emailed or delivered in person to the City Hall Drop Box located outside the front door of city hall.
The public will also be able to ask questions or comment on the report during the Sept. 14 council meeting, which is set for 7 p.m. at the White Rock Community Centre
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Surrey Schools Superintendent Jordan Tinney says that while there are no immediate plans to implement any new anti-racism and Black history education at the start of the upcoming school year, the district is first looking at how it can make that happen in the future.
On Thursday (Aug. 20), the Now-Leader spoke with Tinney about where the district is following allegations in June from teacher in Surrey about the racism he says he’s faced while working here. The English teacher at Earl Marriott Secondary, said he decided to speak out after the death of George Floyd, who died while being restrained by police in Minneapolis in May.
Tinney admitted the district has more work to do despite the “number of resources that deal with racism.”stating One way to achieve this in the 2020-21 school year, could be by hosting open forums that “create a safe vessel for people to come and tell their stories.”